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  • Title: Key High School Reform Strategies: An Overview of Research Findings. New American High Schools: High Schools at the Leading Edge of Reform.

    Author: Visher, Mary G.; Teitelbaum, Peter; Emanuel, David

    Year: 1999

    Publication Information: ED Pubs, P.O. Box 1398, Jessup, MD 20794-1398; Tel: 877-433-7827 (Toll Free); U.S. Department of Education, Office of Vocational and Adult Education, Rm. 4090, MES, Washington, DC 20202-7100; Tel: 202-205-5451; TDD/FIRS: 800-877-8339: Web site: http://www.ed.gov/offices/OVAE/nahs; e-mail: ovae@inet.ed.gov

    ERIC number: ED430271

    Abstract: This document reviews the relevant education literature to assess the evidence that reform strategies, such as those being used in New American High Schools, have affected educational outcomes, including school attendance, grades, skills attainment, graduation rates, and postgraduation activities. The overview focuses on 10 strategies: (1) raise academic standards; (2) create small learning environments enabling students and teachers to work together; (3) structure learning around careers and students' interests; (4) promote student achievement by enhancing educators' professional development; (5) link students' out-of-school learning experiences to classroom learning; (6) provide counseling to encourage indepth college and career awareness; (7) reorganize the school day into flexible, relevant segments; (8) assess students' progress by what they are capable of doing; (9) forge partnerships with two- and four-year postsecondary institutions; and (10) forge active student-support alliances involving educators, employers, parents, and communities. The report is organized by the strategies. Each section begins by defining the concept underlying the strategy and then clarifying the major reasons why the strategy is thought to work. Research studies are cited next. Each section concludes with a summary of the strategy's effectiveness. Sources for the study included electronic databases, publications from organizations that are leaders in promoting or documenting education reform, and individual experts.

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